Last week, I posted an article called Make Extra Cash With Your Twitter Account.

That was the article where I introduced you to a cool program called Sponsored Tweets.  This program is an ad network that allows you to get paid for sending out tweets for advertisers.

When I posted last week about this program, I had several people ask me what they needed to do in order to get people to sponsor them.  They wanted to know what had to be done to actually start making money on the program.

Today, I’ll answer those questions and give you exactly what you need to know to start breaking the bank with your Twitter account.

Followers

One of the first things that advertisers look at is the number of followers that you have so get out there and build some more followers on your account.

Is your spam radar going off right now?  It should be.  If you’re building followers for the sole purpose of capitalizing on them, then that is just wrong.  You are a spammer.

You should be building followers to connect with people.  The added revenue is a great bonus and I certainly want followers for that reason…but not only for that reason.

I’m not looking for a way to take advantage of people.  I’m looking for a way to make extra money while at the same time providing great value to my readers and followers.  It’s kind of a balancing act.

Clicks

The next thing that potential advertisers want to know is how many clicks they are going to get for their money.

Sponsored tweets actually recommends that we try to average our bid to around $.50 per click but I personally think that it’s good business to try to give customers more value than they spend on us.  My average price per click for my account is around $.18 per click.  It’s about one-third of the recommended price.

Because I offer such a great value, I’m pumped up with confidence when I ask people to sponsor my tweets.  If you want to get in my twitter stream, just click here and hire me to tweet out a link for you.

Influence

Influence is the measure of activities that people are willing to do on your recommendation.  When you post a call to action, those who respond and do what you ask them to do are a reflection of your influence.

While advertisers can’t measure this directly when they’re just glancing at your listing, many advertisers analyze how many conversions their campaigns produce.  They may be interested in more than just clicks but in actual purchases.

If you can deliver with a powerful influence then you’ll probably see them come running back to you with more offers.

Make Money, Have Fun, Don’t Spam

In another previous article, I received an awesome comment expressing adamant opposition to Sponsored Tweets.  Lindsay from BSC Design had this to say about the program:

I just have to say.. i freaking HATE sponsored tweets! Twitter would be a world better without these things and I would personally never promote something like that.

Now I hope that I’m not misrepresenting her, but I’m guessing that she hates the program because of the spam factor.  There are a lot of people who are so hungry to make an extra couple of dollars that they are taking on every opportunity they see and in turn they are diluting their twitter stream with massive amounts of meaningless spam.  Don’t be that person.

Be real with your followers.  Post things that interest you.  Interact with your friends.  And accept a few sponsored tweets along the way.  Don’t turn yourself into a giant spammer that people hate to interact with.

Group Reflection

Are you a member of Sponsored Tweets?  How has it worked out for you so far?  How much are you charging for your tweets?  What is your cost per click?  How many followers do you have and how many clicks do you get on an average tweet?

WHAT!?  You’re not a member of sponsored tweets? Click Here to join in on the fun.

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Nicholas Cardot

About Nicholas Cardot

It's my personal quest to enable every person that I can to unlock that dormant potential concerning their online influence. Also, I'm a geek.

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